Poll

The throw pass
0% (0 votes)
16 a side
21% (3 votes)
No mark kicking backwards in the defensive half
50% (7 votes)
Four field umpires
0% (0 votes)
Under 23 / 5th Interchange
29% (4 votes)
Other (please specify
0% (0 votes)
Total votes: 14
digs

[quote=NorthPort][/quote]

The no mark kicking backwards in the back half was the best rule introduced for many a long day. It eliminated flooding & congestion with fast play on footy. Of course the AFL coaches didn't like it because their fringe players playing at VFL level couldn't adapt to the change of rules. Half a million dollars a year & not a brain in their heads.

We might be from the bush. but we ain't green

vfa
vfa's picture

Kicking backwards in the backline should be outlawed. That rule was great but as digs said the afl does not want its precious fringe players being part that rule as it would prefer to see the ball kicked backwards sideways backwards and sideways. Ugly boring moronic football. I also like the 16 a man vfa style which produced fast open free style footy and often high scores.

Bearsman
Bearsman's picture

I like the 5 players on the interchange.

paul

The kicking backwards rule encouraged flooding to a degree as you knew where the ball was going.

NorthPort
NorthPort's picture

[quote=Bearsman]

I like the 5 players on the interchange.

[/quote]

Ahh of course! I'll add that as a voting option :)

 


digs

[quote=paul]

The kicking backwards rule encouraged flooding to a degree as you knew where the ball was going.

[/quote]

paul
I think the opposite. Any player located in the mid field would have to move forward to pick up a forward player a lot quicker rather than flood the back line with prop & cop footy. Another benefit is that it keeps the game moving rather than time wasting with players stalling looking for unnecessary options.

We might be from the bush. but we ain't green

paul

It was good in theory (and at times encouraged faster footy), but more often than not in reality it just allowed teams to clog the corridor and the opposition's direct avenue to goal because they had to pay less attention to players behind the ball.

That was certainly our strategy, and the Bullants, who were probably the biggest flooding team we've seen in the VFL, thrived with that rule in place, often with all 18 players behind the ball.

As for best rule, 23rd man has my vote out of the list mentioned.

Worst rule would have to be the sliding rule. Ridiculous that a player can win the ball and then get penalised while he has the footy because someone who didn't go as hard as him is in the wrong spot!

Bearsman
Bearsman's picture

[quote=paul]

Worst rule would have to be the sliding rule. Ridiculous that a player can win the ball and then get penalised while he has the footy because someone who didn't go as hard as him is in the wrong spot!

[/quote]

Agree 100% If I remember correctly this rule was brought in when Lindsay Thomas slid into a pack with legs and knees extended and seriously injured an opposition player. I agree with outlawing that action, but the 'interpretation' has been changed over time to include 'contact below the knees' , diving underneath a player, and as Paul said, now paying a free kick to a player not going as hard as his opponent. Without any doubt, the worst rule ever introduced and that is saying something from a game full of illogical rules.

billythekid

16 a side was by far the best innovation that Fred Hill the VFA sec and Alec Gillion President pushed through in the 1960s that along with Sunday footy led to the VFAs golden era that lasted to the mid 1980s.
According to oldtimers that saw the throwing the ball rule it was great also and really opened the game right up and produced high scoring matches.

vfa
vfa's picture

Loved 16 a side footy. No kicking backwards or to the side back then. Flooding did not exist.

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